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A natural fit


Delicious California Sweetpotatoes are not only a fit for your menu—from breakfast to main dish to midnight snack—they’re a nutrition-packed part of your healthy, active lifestyle.

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A natural fit


Delicious California Sweetpotatoes are not only a fit for your menu—from breakfast to main dish to midnight snack—they’re a nutrition-packed part of your healthy, active lifestyle.

CALIFORNIA SWEETPOTATOES ARE MULTIFACETED MARVELS. 

(But don't just take our word for it! Check them out yourself at the 3rd Annual California Sweetpotato Festival on September 19-21, 2014 at the Max Foster Sports Complex in Livingston, CA.)

GOOD FOR YOU   

Extremely high in nutritional value, California Sweetpotatoes put the “super” in “superfood.”  

REMARKABLY VERSATILE 

Bake them, boil them, broil them, grill them, fry them, steam them, roast them, sauté them, puree them or just wrap them in a paper towel and pop ‘em in the microwave—savory or sweet, they’re the clever cook’s favorite vegetable.

RIDICULOUSLY TASTY

It’s one of life’s biggest questions: How can something this super-nutritious be this profusely delicious? We’re happy to ponder it while enjoying a vegetable so sweet it makes the other veggies jealous.

EASY AS PIE

Well, actually even easier. When it comes to preparation, California Sweetpotatoes are equally comfortable totally dressed up or wearing next to nothing at all. Try one baked with a little olive oil and sea salt. 

UP & COMING

No, Sweetpotatoes didn’t just fall off the turnip truck, but these days everywhere you look, chefs, cooks and culinarians of every description are discovering just how naturally amazing California Sweetpotatoes are.

 

RICHLY SATISFYING

California Sweetpotatoes are famous for their ability to deliver loads of fulfilling flavor. One reason is the manganese they contain. Manganese is a mineral that helps support healthy blood sugar levels, which can help stabilize the appetite for hours.

We're also quite social!

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CA difference


In the world of Sweetpotatoes, there’s pretty darn good—and then there’s premium.

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CA difference


In the world of Sweetpotatoes, there’s pretty darn good—and then there’s premium.

Here are a few factors that set Sweetpotatoes grown in California apart from the rest:

California’s generous sunshine and warm, dry climate provide the perfect conditions for the highest quality product by enabling lush, rapid growth and a year-round Sweetpotato supply. 

Sand grown rather than being grown in dirt, California Sweetpotatoes are raised in a unique region in the San Joaquin Valley—a low spot where rivers deposited sand many, many years ago when water tables were higher. This special sandy loam naturally resists insects and weeds and is the perfect place for our sweetpotatoes to catch some rays.

Naturally sun-cured on the vine, California Sweetpotatoes are cured in the ground before harvest to increase shelf-life, rather than being picked first and then cured in sheds.

Beautiful shapes and skin texture are made possible by hand-planting, selecting, sorting, sizing and packing. Getting up-close and personal with each Sweetpotato not only ensures it meets our high California quality standards, it minimizes scaring and scratching that often results from a mechanized process.

Food-Safe(r) – California agricultural regulations are among the strictest in the world to ensure food safety and environmental accountability.

A proud agricultural history with deep roots that extend back several generations.  John Bettencourt Avila (1865-1937), a Portuguese-American who settled in Merced County, California has been called the father of the Sweetpotato industry.  Most California Sweetpotatoes are still family grown on legacy farms in Merced county, and its neighboring counties, Stanislaus and Kern, by attentive farmers using sustainable practices such as controlled fertilization and mindfully managed drip irrigation.

Wider variety – color, size, shape, flavor!  There are many types of Sweetpotatoes, ranging from white and mild to deep red and super sweet. You can even find purple sweetpotatoes. Many are grown in small quantities and can be found at local farmers markets around California. Approximately 12 types are available commercially, but the four most popular ones from California found in grocery stores nationwide are:

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  • Jewell (Orange)
    A favorite for mashing or roasting, the Jewell has rose-colored skin and super-sweet orange flesh. Eat it whole with your favorite toppings or cut into wedges and bake it as a side dish.
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  • Jersey (White)
    The Jersey has a pale copper skin, almost like a potato, but don’t be fooled. This Sweetpotato’s white flesh is sweet, creamy and ideal for soups and stews.
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  • Oriental (Purple)
    The Oriental looks like a potato on the inside, but its distinct purple skin most definitely sets it apart. This variety is great for cubing, shredding or frying, and perfect for Asian-inspired dishes.
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  • Garnet (Red)
    This “Red” or “Garnet” Sweetpotato has red skin and deep orange flesh and is perfect for Sweetpotato fries or adding color to all sorts of dishes.
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Warm sand grown


California's sandy soil is like a perfect 'resort'
for growing nutritious sweetpotatoes.

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Warm sand grown


California's sandy soil is like a perfect 'resort'
for growing nutritious sweetpotatoes.

From Store to Storage

When selecting Sweetpotatoes, be sure to check them for signs of decay.

Don’t store your California Sweetpotatoes in the refrigerator, as it will produce a hard core in the center. Instead, store them in a cool, dry, well-ventilated container at approximately 55 degrees F

For the best flavor and freshness, use your Sweetpotatoes within a week or two after purchase

“I Yam What I Yam,” said no Sweetpotato, ever.

Long, long ago, new immigrants to America thought that our Sweetpotatoes looked a bit like a smaller version of the very large root vegetable they knew back home as a “yam,” and a misnomer was born that has lasted until now. Though there are many varieties of Sweetpotato, with different colors, flavors and textures, Sweetpotatoes are not the same thing as yams. Real yams, which are generally imported into the US, are dry and starchy and members of the Yam plant family. The scientific name of the relatively small, moist Sweetpotato is Ipomoea batatas and it's a member of the morning glory family.  California grows both “dry flesh” and “moist flesh” varieties

Sweet? Yes. Potato? No.

“Sweetpotato” as one word is not only grammatically correct, it’s a handy way to remind you that a Sweetpotato is not simply a “sweet potato.” In fact, it’s not a potato at all, but a different vegetable entirely, blessed with a totally different nutrient set. While both hail from the same botanical order, they come from different families. (And boy can your family make a difference in how you turn out!) Low in carbs, high in vitamins and minerals, the California Sweetpotato is a designated superfood. With almost twice as much fiber as a white potato, a California Sweetpotato’s calories are burned more slowly and efficiently than a low-fiber carbohydrate. On a per-acre basis, California Sweetpotatoes are the most nutrient-dense of any commercially grown food.

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The Council


We are a voluntary organization founded in 1977.

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The Council


We are a voluntary organization founded in 1977.

The California Sweetpotato Council 

The California Sweetpotato Council’s main objective is to develop policies and programs that enhance the Sweetpotato industry in California. 

For more information contact us.